Waikato / King Country

Waikato / King Country

Rangiriri to Huntly - OPEN

Northern Start
Rangiriri Bridge (Junction of SH1 and Churchill East Rd)
Southern End
Hakarimata Scenic Reserve, end of Parker Rd
Distance
21.5km
Time
1 day
Track Standard
Road margin   Footpath   Easy tramping track   Tramping track   Route   Mixed grade  
Potential Hazards
  • Vehicles on road or track - the Glenmurray Bridge is one lane with a VERY narrow footpath.
  • Farming operations
  • Track exposed to sun, wind or cold
  • Beware flying golf balls! Also the Waikato River is dangerous. Don't swim in the river. Water erosion may undermine the bank near the river edge. Supervise children closely.
Description
(North to South)
NO dogs, guns, camping or fires.

Once you've crossed the bridge, continue a further 150m around the first corner and there is a stile to take you across the first fence to this riverside track which runs parallel to Te Ohaki Rd. On a clear day, you'll see the orange-topped chimneys of the Huntly Power station standing in the distance. 

1.5km in, past Maurea Marae, there's a monument to the Ngati Naho chief, Te Wheoro, whose personal history embodies the extraordinary stresses of colonial rule on Waikato Maori as they argued strategies to preserve tribal identity. Te Wheoro sided at first with the Crown. In 1857, he spoke against setting up a Maori king and, at the great conference of Maori leaders at Kohimarama in 1860, spoke again in favour of the Government. Governor Grey's British troops invaded Waikato territory in July 1863 and, in November that year, overcame the Maori redoubt at Rangiriri, forcing the Maori King, Tawhiao, out of Ngaruawahia to sanctuary around Waitomo and Te Kuiti. In the years that followed, Te Wheoro acted as an intermediary for the Government's negotiation with the King. As a Maori MP over the next two decades, Te Wheoro witnessed Government decisions he saw as racist and finally became an implacable critic of the Native Land Court. He came to believe local self-government was right for Maori and in 1884, in company with Tawhiao, he travelled to England to petition Queen Victoria for redress of Maori land seizures.

At 7km, the track comes up to the Huntly Golf Course. It cleaves to the river here, keeping behind a screen of trees, safe from the golf balls that ping up the 16th fairway. At the tee, it's safe to come out. The clubhouse is close by and open most weekends for hot food, maybe even a beer. Walkers welcome.

The track follows the stopbank out to Te Ohaki Rd, to circumvent the Huntly Power Station's ash ponds. It stays on the road verge for another kilometre before ducking back onto the stopbanks, crossing Maori land between Te Ohaaki Marae and the river, then exits back onto the road. For the last 200m it enters shady bush through the sculpture park in front of Huntly Power Station.

From the Sculpture Park, continue south along footpaths/road margins on Te Ohaki Rd - Harris Rd - Riverview Rd and then (500m into Hakarimata Rd) turn right (south-west) into Parker Road.  Walk 800m along this road to DOC's Hakarimata Scenic Reserve.

Note: Map is indicative only
Extra Info
Background Information 
Signage at the track start offers walkers the protection of the taniwha, Tarakokomako, and names the seven now-vanished  ancestral villages and the two existing marae en route.
Look out for the plaque carved with a taniwha and a greeting from Tainui:
  • Kia tupato kia pai to hikoi - Walk the path in safety
  • Me te titiro whanui, kia koa - Look deeply and learn
  • Ki nga taonga kei mua i a koe - From your surroundings

A short detour beyond the sculpture park opposite Huntly Power Station, hidden from sight, is a modernist sculpture - an immense and strikingly Maori figure -with poupou standing up from a reflective pool. This depicts the 1995 settlement of a grievance dating back to the 1860s when the largest land confiscation of any tribe was imposed on Tainui.

Huntly

General information
Huntly I-SITE Visitor Information - 156 Great South Rd, Huntly - P: 07 828 6406

Getting there/away
InterCity - Major North Island routes - W: - E: info@intercity.co.nz - P: 09 583 5780 - (call centre open 7am-8pm)
Naked Bus - P: 0900 62533 (calls cost)
BusIt (Huntly & Hamilton) - P: 0800 800 401 
 
Local transport
Huntly Taxis - P: 07 828 0100

Accommodation
Accommodation is available in Huntly, across the Tainui Bridge from the Te Araroa route on the eastern side of the river:
Lake Hakanoa Huntly Motor Camping Grounds and Holiday Park - 5 Taihua St, Huntly - P: 07 828 8363 - 15 tent sites, 42 power sites, 4 onsite caravans, 3 cabins. On the shores of Lake Hakanoa
The Essex (2 kms beyond the southern trailhead) - 151 Main St, Huntly - P: 07 828 7179 
Manor Views - 24 Upland Rd, Huntly - P: 07 8280171 or 021 959562 
 
 
Resupply
Fred's 4 Four Square - Gordon Rd, Huntly - P: 07 828 7438 
Countdown Supermarket - 16/18 Tumate Mahuta Drive, Huntly - P: 07 828 2041
 

 

Requirements
  • Keep to the track
  • Respect private land
  • Leave gates as you find them
  • No dogs
  • No firearms
  • No camping
  • No fires
Environment
  • Take all rubbish with you
Amenities
(Start)
  • No amenities
  • Accommodation & food at the Rangiriri Hotel, Rangiriri Road, Rangiriri. Hosts John and Bev Gear. Phone 07 826 3467.
Amenities
(On Route)
  • Full range of amenities in Huntly
  • Clubhouse cafe at Huntly Golf Club, 540 Te Ohaki Rd
Amenities
(End)
  • Full range of amenities in Huntly
Closest Town(s)
Huntly & Rangiriri
Managed by
Te Araroa Waikato Trust & Environment Waikato
Contact
Te Araroa Waikato
Thanks to
Thanks for its formation to Sonia Frimmel, Noel Sandford, Sonny Hapi, Jeff Kani and the work gang, also Genesis Power, Tainui Group Holdings, the Waikato Raupatu Lands Trust, and Tahi Ngakete, Environment Waikato, the farmers en route, Maori landowners, and Trust Waikato.
Northern Start
Rangiriri Bridge (Junction of SH1 and Churchill East Rd)
Southern End
Hakarimata Scenic Reserve, end of Parker Rd
Distance
21.5km
Time
1 day
Track Standard
Road margin   Footpath   Easy tramping track   Tramping track   Route   Mixed grade  
Description
(North to South)
NO dogs, guns, camping or fires.

Once you've crossed the bridge, continue a further 150m around the first corner and there is a stile to take you across the first fence to this riverside track which runs parallel to Te Ohaki Rd. On a clear day, you'll see the orange-topped chimneys of the Huntly Power station standing in the distance. 

1.5km in, past Maurea Marae, there's a monument to the Ngati Naho chief, Te Wheoro, whose personal history embodies the extraordinary stresses of colonial rule on Waikato Maori as they argued strategies to preserve tribal identity. Te Wheoro sided at first with the Crown. In 1857, he spoke against setting up a Maori king and, at the great conference of Maori leaders at Kohimarama in 1860, spoke again in favour of the Government. Governor Grey's British troops invaded Waikato territory in July 1863 and, in November that year, overcame the Maori redoubt at Rangiriri, forcing the Maori King, Tawhiao, out of Ngaruawahia to sanctuary around Waitomo and Te Kuiti. In the years that followed, Te Wheoro acted as an intermediary for the Government's negotiation with the King. As a Maori MP over the next two decades, Te Wheoro witnessed Government decisions he saw as racist and finally became an implacable critic of the Native Land Court. He came to believe local self-government was right for Maori and in 1884, in company with Tawhiao, he travelled to England to petition Queen Victoria for redress of Maori land seizures.

At 7km, the track comes up to the Huntly Golf Course. It cleaves to the river here, keeping behind a screen of trees, safe from the golf balls that ping up the 16th fairway. At the tee, it's safe to come out. The clubhouse is close by and open most weekends for hot food, maybe even a beer. Walkers welcome.

The track follows the stopbank out to Te Ohaki Rd, to circumvent the Huntly Power Station's ash ponds. It stays on the road verge for another kilometre before ducking back onto the stopbanks, crossing Maori land between Te Ohaaki Marae and the river, then exits back onto the road. For the last 200m it enters shady bush through the sculpture park in front of Huntly Power Station.

From the Sculpture Park, continue south along footpaths/road margins on Te Ohaki Rd - Harris Rd - Riverview Rd and then (500m into Hakarimata Rd) turn right (south-west) into Parker Road.  Walk 800m along this road to DOC's Hakarimata Scenic Reserve.

Potential Hazards
  • Vehicles on road or track - the Glenmurray Bridge is one lane with a VERY narrow footpath.
  • Farming operations
  • Track exposed to sun, wind or cold
  • Beware flying golf balls! Also the Waikato River is dangerous. Don't swim in the river. Water erosion may undermine the bank near the river edge. Supervise children closely.
Description
(North to South)
NO dogs, guns, camping or fires.

Once you've crossed the bridge, continue a further 150m around the first corner and there is a stile to take you across the first fence to this riverside track which runs parallel to Te Ohaki Rd. On a clear day, you'll see the orange-topped chimneys of the Huntly Power station standing in the distance. 

1.5km in, past Maurea Marae, there's a monument to the Ngati Naho chief, Te Wheoro, whose personal history embodies the extraordinary stresses of colonial rule on Waikato Maori as they argued strategies to preserve tribal identity. Te Wheoro sided at first with the Crown. In 1857, he spoke against setting up a Maori king and, at the great conference of Maori leaders at Kohimarama in 1860, spoke again in favour of the Government. Governor Grey's British troops invaded Waikato territory in July 1863 and, in November that year, overcame the Maori redoubt at Rangiriri, forcing the Maori King, Tawhiao, out of Ngaruawahia to sanctuary around Waitomo and Te Kuiti. In the years that followed, Te Wheoro acted as an intermediary for the Government's negotiation with the King. As a Maori MP over the next two decades, Te Wheoro witnessed Government decisions he saw as racist and finally became an implacable critic of the Native Land Court. He came to believe local self-government was right for Maori and in 1884, in company with Tawhiao, he travelled to England to petition Queen Victoria for redress of Maori land seizures.

At 7km, the track comes up to the Huntly Golf Course. It cleaves to the river here, keeping behind a screen of trees, safe from the golf balls that ping up the 16th fairway. At the tee, it's safe to come out. The clubhouse is close by and open most weekends for hot food, maybe even a beer. Walkers welcome.

The track follows the stopbank out to Te Ohaki Rd, to circumvent the Huntly Power Station's ash ponds. It stays on the road verge for another kilometre before ducking back onto the stopbanks, crossing Maori land between Te Ohaaki Marae and the river, then exits back onto the road. For the last 200m it enters shady bush through the sculpture park in front of Huntly Power Station.

From the Sculpture Park, continue south along footpaths/road margins on Te Ohaki Rd - Harris Rd - Riverview Rd and then (500m into Hakarimata Rd) turn right (south-west) into Parker Road.  Walk 800m along this road to DOC's Hakarimata Scenic Reserve.

Note: Map is indicative only
Extra Info
Background Information 
Signage at the track start offers walkers the protection of the taniwha, Tarakokomako, and names the seven now-vanished  ancestral villages and the two existing marae en route.
Look out for the plaque carved with a taniwha and a greeting from Tainui:
  • Kia tupato kia pai to hikoi - Walk the path in safety
  • Me te titiro whanui, kia koa - Look deeply and learn
  • Ki nga taonga kei mua i a koe - From your surroundings

A short detour beyond the sculpture park opposite Huntly Power Station, hidden from sight, is a modernist sculpture - an immense and strikingly Maori figure -with poupou standing up from a reflective pool. This depicts the 1995 settlement of a grievance dating back to the 1860s when the largest land confiscation of any tribe was imposed on Tainui.

Huntly

General information
Huntly I-SITE Visitor Information - 156 Great South Rd, Huntly - P: 07 828 6406

Getting there/away
InterCity - Major North Island routes - W: - E: info@intercity.co.nz - P: 09 583 5780 - (call centre open 7am-8pm)
Naked Bus - P: 0900 62533 (calls cost)
BusIt (Huntly & Hamilton) - P: 0800 800 401 
 
Local transport
Huntly Taxis - P: 07 828 0100

Accommodation
Accommodation is available in Huntly, across the Tainui Bridge from the Te Araroa route on the eastern side of the river:
Lake Hakanoa Huntly Motor Camping Grounds and Holiday Park - 5 Taihua St, Huntly - P: 07 828 8363 - 15 tent sites, 42 power sites, 4 onsite caravans, 3 cabins. On the shores of Lake Hakanoa
The Essex (2 kms beyond the southern trailhead) - 151 Main St, Huntly - P: 07 828 7179 
Manor Views - 24 Upland Rd, Huntly - P: 07 8280171 or 021 959562 
 
 
Resupply
Fred's 4 Four Square - Gordon Rd, Huntly - P: 07 828 7438 
Countdown Supermarket - 16/18 Tumate Mahuta Drive, Huntly - P: 07 828 2041
 

 

Requirements
  • Keep to the track
  • Respect private land
  • Leave gates as you find them
  • No dogs
  • No firearms
  • No camping
  • No fires
Environment
  • Take all rubbish with you
Amenities
(Start)
  • No amenities
  • Accommodation & food at the Rangiriri Hotel, Rangiriri Road, Rangiriri. Hosts John and Bev Gear. Phone 07 826 3467.
Amenities
(On Route)
  • Full range of amenities in Huntly
  • Clubhouse cafe at Huntly Golf Club, 540 Te Ohaki Rd
Amenities
(End)
  • Full range of amenities in Huntly
Closest Town(s)
Huntly & Rangiriri
Managed by
Te Araroa Waikato Trust & Environment Waikato
Contact
Te Araroa Waikato
Thanks to
Thanks for its formation to Sonia Frimmel, Noel Sandford, Sonny Hapi, Jeff Kani and the work gang, also Genesis Power, Tainui Group Holdings, the Waikato Raupatu Lands Trust, and Tahi Ngakete, Environment Waikato, the farmers en route, Maori landowners, and Trust Waikato.